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Blogging about college football by an Oklahoma Sooners fan.

On the Spot: Will Muschamp


When I first looked at the iPhone with all of its cool bells and whistles, I decided that I had to have one. It's hip. It's a conversation starter. And most importantly, you can't help but feel like you'll be better off once you have one. I mean, that one guy runs his entire company on his for crying out loud.

I've had my iPhone for a little more than six months now, and it seems like I like it. The different apps are pretty neat. I like the video and audio functions. The browser is great. Overall, I feel like I keep telling myself that I've reached some ineffable level of all-around "better" for having it.

The only problem is that I don't really know if I can explain how it's better than my old Blackberry, let alone if it actually is. Since I've had it, I haven't really been able to achieve the level of excitement that I felt when I was about to buy it. Nor have I reached some nirvana-like state of mobile computing. In short, it's cool, but it's not the end-all-be-all that it seems. (And typing on it kinda sucks. And why didn't anyone tell me there wasn't a cut-and-paste option?)

Whether they want to admit it or not, defensive coordinator Will Muschamp is the no-longer-brand-new iPhone for Burnt Orange Nation.
Coach Blood arrived in Austin from Auburn last offseason oozing with promise. Given the Longhorns' success with ex-Auburn defensive coordinator Gene Chizik, Texas fans had good reason to think Muschamp could shore up a defense that struggled mightily in 2007. In fact, Muschamp so ingratiated himself on the 40 Acres that the higher-ups decided to name him Mack Brown's successor before the end of his first season at UT.
The Longhorns had an outstanding year in 2008--they beat Oklahoma, won a BCS bowl game and finished the season with a sparkling 12-1 record. So it's not surprising that the Texas brass and fan base collectively feel better about the state of their program with Muschamp on board.
And it's not like Texas' defense didn't show signs of improvement last year. For example, the Longhorn D gave up seven fewer points per game than they did in '07. Sacks jumped dramatically, up from 28 in '07 to 47 in '08, evidence of the life the fiery coordinator injected into his unit.
On the other hand, Texas allowed slightly more yards per play last year than the year before--5.5 to 5.3. Turnovers generated were way down in 2008. Also, some of Texas' tougher competition rolled up some big offensive numbers. Against OU, while the Longhorn defenders came up big when they needed to, the Sooners still strafed UT for 35 points and nearly 400 yards passing. Likewise, Texas Tech gained almost 600 yards in total offense en route to 39 points in a win over UT.
Where, exactly, is the dramatic improvement that warrants all the excitement around the young coach-in-waiting? Clearly, Muschamp looks and feels the part of the energetic young turk ready to lead the Longhorns. At the end of the upcoming season, we may have a better idea if really he is.